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. >> the cruel irony here is that the united states is well-regarded in libya. and there's a moderate government in place. and this is clearly the actions of an isolated and very small but very vicious terrorist group. and so we've got to protect ourselves from those groups. and we've got to go after them. >> reporter: and, wolf, as i said, we're expecting momentarily a briefing background here at the state department. there are a lot of details. everyone that we talk to says that it was a very, very complex almost chaotic situation. fighting on the outside. fire on the inside. and so we expect to have more details as we go along. >> and so far we've only been told the names of chris stephens and sean smith. the other two they have not released their names yet, is that right? >> yes. they were security officials. >> not u.s. marines though? >> reporter: no. we understand were not marines. they were security personnel. >> let us know what happens at this background briefing you're about to get. and you'll update our viewers. standby for that. jill dougherty. let's go to nic robertson now in londo
there simply as a diversion. four americans died including the united states ambassador to libya chris stevens. our foreign affairs correspondent, jill dougherty, has been working her sources to get a better idea on exactly what happened. our senior international correspondent nic robertson is monitoring the search for who's responsible. and our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence is keeping tabs on the u.s. military's response to what's going on as well. let's go to jill first. she's watching what's going on. jill, what's the latest over at the state department beyond the heartbreak of a top u.s. diplomat, three others killed? >> right, wolf. just in a few minutes we're expecting an update, a briefing on background by senior officials here at the state department. but for now this is what we know based on the conversations and what we are hearing from u.s. officials. tuesday night at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, a complex and highly dangerous situation. outside an anti-american protest. then a group of heavily armed militants, approximately two dozen of them, launched an attack firing ro
, the global public square. welcome to all of you around the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have at important story for you today. start with the proet -- protests. we'll talk to paul wolfowitz and others. next up, michael lewis spent eight months in the white house with unprecedented access to president obama. we'll talk about who obama is and how he makes decisions. also, why is israel trying to get the united states to commit to waging war when israel itself isn't willing to do so. and finally we'll take a look at these pictures. do you think they were taken by nasa or the european space agency? no, a teenager with a second-hand camera. >>> but first here's my take. the images of the american embassy burning in benghazi might have conjured up memories of tehran in 1979, but the analogy is false. in libya, the government is not fomenting anti-americanism. it is fighting it, openly declaring america an ally and friend. libya is pro-american by two to one. the violence there appears to have been the work of small extremist elements that lack much popular support.
are reaction to a little-known amateur movie produced in the united states which ridiculed the prophet mohammed. it gained attention because an obscure florida pastor began promoting it, the same man who triggered deadly riots in afghanistan when he threatened to burn the koran. we want to go straight to cairo where we find nbc chief foreign correspondent, richard engel. richard, fill us in a little more this morning. >> reporter: good morning. a libyan source has told nbc news that the u.s. ambassador who was visiting the consulate was killed along with three others. not sure of the nationality of those three others. the u.s. state department has not confirmed this, but this has been told to us by a senior security source in libya. we've been also told that the libyan prime minister and the libyan president will both be speaking today about this subject, offering their condolences to the united states and to the family of the fallen ambassador. and this is according to the report. we were told that when gunmen and a mob stormed the consulate building, they first attacked it with rpgs, then the
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 21, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader smed. mr. reid: i had move to proceed to calendar number 504. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 504, s. 3525, a bill to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fish, and shooting and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the next hour will be equally divided between the two leader leaders who are their designees.
to be realistic about how we can tackle these challenges. if there is a crisis that i see in the united states for the long term, it is not the temporal issue of how we will deal with money. because i am very confident we will be able to deal with that. it is how will we bring that -- bring back our sense of what we can accomplish together as americans when we are realistic about those challenges. that is the thing i think about the word "crisis" in this country. >> mayor castro is not the first to suggest that. for 10 years now, we heard that the government is not asking all of us to do enough. >> it is interesting. the word "sacrifice," when i hear a politician say that, it usually means grab your wallet. it usually means increasing taxes. and i will give president obama credit to in his the first presidential candidate since walter mondale to run explicitly on a platform that he will raise taxes. >> he is saying he will raise taxes on the wealthy. >> according to the supreme court, he already has raised taxes. that was the basis on which the supreme court of held obamacare, that it was a ta
to dissociate the united states from that hateful video that insulted the prophet of islam. he said that there are important rights of free speech under the first amendment and we have to protect those rights, and if the government a press free-speech, it makes the world a less free place. he also had a message for iran, that while we want to negotiate through diplomacy if possible, time is not unlimited. that was a warning to the iranian government, which has been obstreperous and very difficult to deal with. i think it was a very important speech the president gave in new york. host: how about mitt romney? can you assess from what you have heard and hear him write these past few months? is there a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encapsulate it? guest: i don't know if there is a romney doctrine yet. governor romney is a very smart, successful person. my guess is that it is not the issue he wants to emphasize in the campaign. once the campaign to be about the economy and the unemployment rate. it is a difficult position for a republican to be running against a democ
are furious with the united states -- if you talk to the pakistanis, we want the opportunity, and we want that kind of social link. it would help to build ties with the united states, and put a lot more of our concentration into society where the face of society is the face of your neighbor, the engineer who works in a ditch, the face of a student, the face of your child who has come to america, etc.. our focus on what pakistan is. i am not sure that is going to be possible in the next two years, and this is my second point. i will get back to the international element in a minute. i think that it is right for us to make sure that we focus on the issue of the counterinsurgency issues that we have. we have to deal with that correctly. we have to deal with al qaeda. we have to do with international terrorism. until 2014, it is unlikely in my mind that we can have a major change. that does not mean we cannot do our hallmark. it does not mean we cannot get, for example, the dynamic, philanthropic sector of pakistan to work with the thorough -- very dynamic philanthropic sector in the states,
. the united states drew a clear, red line. iran backed off. different lines can be drawn in the i iranian nuclear program. but to be credible, a line must be drawn first and foremost in one vital part of their program -- on their efforts to enrich uranium. let me explain why. any bomb consists of an explosive material and a mechanism to ignite it. the simplest example is fuse.der in and a you light the fuse and set off the gunpowder. the gunpowder is enriched uranium in regards to iran's nuclear program. the fuse is a detonator. for iran, amassing enough uranium is far more difficult than producing a nuclear fuse. for a country like iran, it takes many, many years to enrich uranium for a bomb. that requires thousands of center fuses spinning in tandem in big industrial plants. those are green plants are visible. they are still vulnerable. in contrast, iran could produce a record detonator, the fuse, in a lot less time. maybe under a year. maybe only a few months. the detonator can be made in a small workshop the size of the classroom. it might be difficult to find and target that workshop
is unthinkable. and devastating. and when i become president of the united states, we will stop it. i will not cut our commitment to our military. >> the president once again blasted romney's hidden camera comments on the 47% of americans he dubbed victims of government dependence. >> i don't think we can get very far with leaders who writeoff half the nation as a bunch of victims who never take responsibility for their own lives. >> 47% of the people vote for the president no matter what. who -- >> the obama campaign turned romney's secretly recorded remarks into a devastating new ad claiming the gop nominee's words under the families and veterans. >> so my job is not to worry about -- they should take personal responsibility. >> romney two days in a row out to link national security to the nati sluggh recovery. he's seizing on new economic data revising down the 2nd quarter gdp. >> this is not just one quarter. this has been going on now for years. china's growing much faster than we. russia's growing faster than we. our economy needs to be reinvigorated. >> but not all the numbers
for the united states coming on and misleading the public. basically we have sent a letter to ambassador rice to explain herself. >> you know, there's a story out today, i didn't know if you saw it, senator, but the story essentially was that the united states government within 24 hours knew it was a pre-planned terrorist attack. your thought on that. because that indicts rice and whomever else was in this cover-up even more. >> that's right. ambassador rice came on the sunday morning programs and said that, in fact, it was a spontaneous reaction of course to the video. and in no way was an expression of hostility toward america. and you have to say killing four american heroes, quite honestly, attacking our consulate, if that's not hostility toward america, i don't know what it is. so, no, i think it's pretty apparent that the administration must have known, had information, and ambassador rice was sent out on the sunday programs to mislead the american public. i find that outrageous, and i think she needs to explain herself and explain herself fast. we should also call for an investigation.
offered in the united states. in fact, in the world. and net, it is a very under-utilized program. no matter how hard we try to market it and sell it to our employees as a great resource, many people do not take advantage of it. it may be because it is viewed as, sort of, mental health. that -- what if my colleagues found out. so this is where corporate culture that walked the talk on health-seeking behavior can really make a difference. i learned this in my role. that's when i tell my -- why i tell my story. i tell my story to my employees, too. i say it is ok, because i believe you all need to seek whatever help you need to seek to be able to help with well being and also to do what's necessary to prevent suicide. and it really can make a difference. we have designed a comprehensive and effective suicide prevention program. we make a wide array of resources available to our members, employees, family members, to our clients' employees and family members, especially advocating for individuals to know when and how to seek help. this is available as well in the -- on the -- in the
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
in and see him. him is the president of the united states. he's very much a junior partner. that is the new vice presidency. and that's what's really changed. it began under mondale and was that way to our country -- well, it wasn't so useful under cheney but i think now the vice president is a junior partner. he's explained to barack obama. looking up to him as a smarter guy, perhaps a tougher guy. but certainly with great loyalty. >> ed shultz, we're leading up to the president's speech. what are your impressions there? >> he was trying really hard tonight. he was trying to get as emotionally connected to the audience as he possibly could. it wasn't his smoothest performance, but it was effective. you could tell the crowd was involved. they know this man. they know what he's about. he's a genuine guy. high on sincerity, believable. i thought it was good testimony to the president. >> chris? >> i don't think we've seen that pitch of the president so far. the idea that it's about his judgment and what's in his gut and this kind of undescribable part of his being that can make the right call
for making mitt romney the next president of the united states. we have got a job to do, friends. and you know what? we have a lot of people who need jobs. and we have a big choice ahead of us. the question is, are we going to stick with four more years of the same? the same path? no. are we going to have a country in debt, doubt, and decline? or are we going to do what we need to do to get people back to work, to fix the mess in washington, and to get this country back on the right track. [applause] we want to earn your support. we want to deserve a victory. here is the problem. president obama and too many politicians like him in washington, they are more worried about their next election than they are worried about the next generation. [applause] we need leadership. you have mark here. that man is a great leader. send him back to help us fix the mess in washington. we have entrepreneurs in this country that built this country. by the way, john phillips, we are here at your business. you know what? you built this business. [applause] the government does not get the credit for that. you
in united states to shrink from our belief in universal rights. i think it's just the example we get to the rest of the world. and that example because of events in recent years and iraq and afghanistan and elsewhere, the fact that our political system is not functioning as smoothly as it might have at one point, not as smoothly as it could operate, i think we've lost a little bit of our ability to influence others in the world. we have to acknowledge that, and we have to regain that. and then they will perhaps start following some of the examples we've set forward. we are still the most successful country, i think, democracy and the world. i think we been an example to asia, an example to europe. the doctor mentioned the marshall plan. that brought europe to where it is now. and i always am amused that people say this change can't happen. look at my european friends, they are all social democrats and they all have teams in queens. so i mean, it can happen. >> okay, more questions. >> hello everybody. i am from belgium and i'm currently working for the washington quarterly. i'd like
was that, as the group here in the united states -- the united way is allowed to deduct from paychecks, yes? in order to have their funding, we wanted to have the same kind of thing possible for this international overseas giving program, which encompassed about 10 very worthy groups. we were actually beaten down on that by the united way who did not want anyone else to have such president, such a privilege, even though the funds -- such a precedent, such a privilege, even though the funds would not be competitive. it would not be going to anybody else in the country but overseas. isen's health care considered in many places a luxury and certainly far down on the list of the imperatives for that nation's funding. >> what should we take away from the virginia state legislators attend to require ultrasound for any women seeking abortions. [laughter] >> you know, it is a good thing my daughter is here. i woke up this morning -- somebody had brought this up yesterday and i was so bloody angry i said, you know what i am tempted to say and she said, don't say that, mom. so i will follow my daught
in the united states. we at the bush center -- are here with the their spouses we're fortunate to be associated with smu. our relationship with smu competed our expectations. i hope we have exceeded your expectations. we're very much involved in action oriented programs. i didn't want to be known as a think tanker. i want to be known as an a,-oriented place that can make a difference in the world. and so i want to thank you very much for having faith in us when we first convince you to support the bush center on the smu campus. we just got back from africa which is. we went over there because at the bush center, one of the major initiatives is to honor human life. we believe all life is precious. whether they live in america on the continent of africa. we are disturbed by the fact that many women who have got the hiv virus, are getting cervical cancer not much is being done with it with your help we put together a collaborative effort to save lives. part of the mission was to kick off the red ribbon in bots wanna as well as to follow up in zambia where we kick it off in december. we wanted to g
and a white america and latino america and asian america. there's a united states of america. >> eight years after the keynote that launched his national career, four years after becoming the nation's first african-american nominee, tonight president barack obama accepts the nomination a second time. tonight the president makes his case for four more years. >> four more years. >> america needs four more years. >> tonight more from the first lady, vice president biden, caroline kennedy, the foo fighters? yes, the foo fighters. weather moved tonight indoors. but after a first night owned by michelle obama, after a second night owned by president clinton, expectations for the finale are sky high. msnbc's primetime coverage of the democratic national convention's final night begins right now. >>> thank you for joining us. i'm rachel maddow here at msnbc headquarters in new york. i'm joined by ed shultz, melissa harris-perry, chris hayes, and the senior strategist steve schmidt. lawrence o'donnell and al sharpton will be joining us in a moment. leading us from the site of the convention is our co
's a crude film. they know it has nothing to do with the united states government. it is an excuse. one intelligence person told me, if you scratch the surface, and if you gave every street vendor from street vendor to prime minister in that region a chance to throw a rock at the u.s. embassy, they would. so this is their excuse. >> look at what's happening in afghanistan 11 years later. >> and look what's happening in afghanistan. and is it just me? willie, is it just me, or is it -- we have the grave concern about the tragedy that happened to the ambassador and our people that have served so proudly for, you know, for the state department who were killed. and yet this weekend, more u.s. troops in afghanistan gunned down by our supposed allies. this happens every day. this happens every day. and yes, our u.s. ambassador being killed is just absolutely horrific. but every single day, young american men and women are gunned down in afghanistan. >> 51 of them this year on insider attacks. 51 nato troops including many americans this year. >> nobody's talking about it. >> to your point exa
. there was no clear consensus about what is the ultimate goal of the united states and europe. is the goal of the one hand or is this just a customs union? it's so dissimilar as many have pointed to the formation of the united states. but here again the idea was let's not try to reach agreement on the end result because there is no consensus but let's take a step at a time and develop the institutions necessary as the problems come up. what wasn't perceived as the context of which the huge decisions would have to be taken was the mother of all financial crises from the united states. so, the pressures are far greater than we are anticipating and the year being forced into making big decisions. we are going to find out if they are willing to make the sacrifices necessary to sustain and. yesterday the peterson institute presented an interesting study of spain and italy whether it was sustainable the conclusion is of the plausible scenarios and the answer is yes. under the circumstances it seemed to me surprising if the project would be abandoned in a sense in that context. >> we and interesting meeting
of the united states being torn down from embassies across the middle east and replaced over sovereign u.s. territory with the flag of al qaeda. you have tens of thousands of people being killed in syria and the administration is doing 234 nothing about it. looks like tehran, 1979, across the middle east. >> that's what many republicans are saying. the democrats and some republicans say governor romney stumbled badly when he criticized mr. obama after the death of the u.s. ambassador to libya. in the end, could you argue that romney's tactic proves successful? it did change the conversation. at least about libya. >> yeah. find it -- fascinating that so many people are talking about romney had a gaffe. it turns out he was right. that one that it was wrong to put pout an n a statement -- criticizing the -- apologizing for the video which the administration continued to do and obama will do again today in his u.n. speech. but also, you know, who had the foreign policy gaffes? it has been president obama. president obama went on "60 minutes" and called what's happening in the middle east bum
. and i should say this too. the israeli prime minister, before embarking to the united states, made remarks briefly yesterday on the holiest day, right before the holiest day in the jewish calendar, yom kippur. he said this speaking about mahmoud ahmadinejad speaking at the united nations on that very same day. and i quote. on this day when we pray to be inscribed to the book of life a platform was given to a dictatorial regime who tries at every step to sentence us to death. it is position of the israeli prime minister if not stopped iran will developed enriched-uranium that could be used to make a bomb as early as spring of 2013. we expect him to elaborate on that in just the next few moments. megyn. megyn: david lee miller, thank you so. there was, as we've always heard from iran some bellicose language from its leader in the united nations. israel will have the chance to respond after mr. netanyahu speaks, we will be joined live right here for reaction and perspective by general jack keane and ambassador john bolton. don't miss it. busy afternoon. >> the cost of food is up. the
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
international indebtedness. if the united states economy is not as strong as it has been in the past, we cannot protect our values around the globe, and we cannot negotiate with bankers. this gives us serious weaknesses on the economic and national-security front. the ultimate insult, we handed to the next generation that had no safe in the kinds of things we have seen go on and ask them to pick up the bill, and that seems like a gross injustice and mass. gerri: i want you to respond to something, david axelrod, the president's base of riser said about this and why the president is doing the right thing. here he is. >> the president's plan would do what the simpson bowles plan would do, cut the deficit by $4 trillion, reduce attack under our deficits down to 3 percent of the gross domestic product which is what everybody agrees we need to stabilize the debt. then we will be in a position to begin reducing it further. gerri: what do you make of that. >> perfect except for a couple of flaws. we have not seen the growth and are not likely to get the kind of growth that they assume in those budget
of the united states. what exactly do you mean? >> well, jim, first of all, i would like to thank the sponsors of this debate and the people of boston for hosting the debate. i would like to thank governor bush for participating, and i would like to say i'm happy to be here with tipper and our family. i have actually not questioned governor bush's experience. i have questioned his proposals. and here is why. i think this is a very important moment for our country. we have achieved extraordinary prosperity. and in this election, america has to make an important choice. will we use our prosperity to enrich not just the few, but all of our families? i believe we have to make the right and responsible choices. if i'm entrusted with the presidency, here are the choices that i will make. i will balance the budget every year. i will pay down the national debt. i will put medicare and social security in a lockbox and protect them. and i will cut taxes for middle- class families. i believe it's important to resist the temptation to squander our surplus. if we make the right choices, we can have a prosp
security at greater risk. >> last friday, mitt romney brought up the president of the united states, his birth certificate. they can't get away from that, but wait a minute, it was just a joke. but the day after the republican convention, speakers lined up to question president obama's americanness. is he really an american? president obama has been president of the united states for nearly four years and republicans are still questioning his values as an american citizen. it's the twisted version of the truth and it was embraced by everybody in the room. >> barack obama has a problem with the american dream. >> obama is stifling the american dream, primarily because it isn't his dream. >> what this administration has in mind for america isn't a renewal. it's a great leveling out. >> barack obama seems intent on enrolling more people on food stamps. >> president obama began his presidency with an apology tour. >> i know you're about ready to throw up, but please bear with me. it wouldn't be the republican national convention without more dishonesty about welfare and medicare. the republi
produce all sorts of nuclear missiles getting ahead of the united states in defense in a way that was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. one of the reasons he won election in 1960. he got into office with access to intelligence and realized soviets are way behind, extremely behind the united states. there is a missile gap in favor of the united states so the problem was kennedy and campaign said we need to increase defense in order to make of this problem and he was committed to that. in 1961 the largest defense buildup in human history and the results to a great extent, one of the ways he dealt with that, and a large portion of humanity to death. >> when did crucial of -- >> guest: he was high on solid leadership but when we went to dinner at stalin's, never knew when the car came back whether it would take us home or to the gulag and it did take some people to the gulag but not crucial of. stalin died in 1953. there were two leaders who were essentially joint leadership. khrushchev and malenkov. by 54-55-56, crucial of was the supreme l
of the united states. it made us proud as americans to know that those prejudices that we've had in the past are falling away. >> beyond some of the more personal areas, we sat down at campaign headquarters the next morning for more detailed discussion about where governor romney stands on the key issues of the campaign. so governor, we talked last night about jobs and the economy and also the debt. i want to begin there. you've called the debt and our deficit a moral crisis and yet in addition to extending the bush tax cuts you want to cut tax rates an additional 20%. you've rejected a 10-1 spending ratio when it comes to spending to increasing taxes. and yet you want to balance the budget. the math simply doesn't add up, does it? >> actually it does. five different economic studies including one at harvard, princeton, aei and a couple at the "wall street journal" all show that if we bring down our o top rates and go across the board, bring down rates for everyone in america, but also limit deductions and exemptions for people at the high end, you can keep the progressivity in the code, rem
.s. prospers. to say manufacturing jobs in general are going to come back to the united states. most chinese products of low cost are going to go other places. they aren't coming back to the u.s. we have to recognize there's a dramatic ure ing in the world and everybody is part participating in it. >> we know the competitive situation always leans towards china because they've got much lower, you know, costs there. so companies are going to send workers to china and going to manufacture in china. what's great about china slowing down for the u.s.? >> i would agree with robert that, yes, there's a structural rebalancing going on. but this rebalancing is great because this enables for china's middle class to grow and create a service sector which can generate continued higher wages. that allows the private sectors in the developed economies to sell to china's middle class and not just depend on america's middle class. this way it gives a new engine of growth for nations around the world. and this is not priced into the markets. the markets have priced in the fact that china is slowing down but
development, threatening not only to our ally israel but threatening to the united states of america and the president has not been successful. in the words of prime minister netanyahu, iran has not changed its nuclear course one iota by virtue of this president's policies. that's something i intend to change. >> you put troops on the ground to stop iran from going nuclear or can you live with a nuclear iran and contain? >> i don't think we live with a nuclear iran. i think we make it very clear a nuclear iran is very unacceptable to civilized nations throughout the world and we'll maintain every option to keep that from happening. >> two presidents have said the very same thing. why can you succeed on iran when they cannot? >> at the time president bush was president iran was years away from a nuclear weapon. he pursued diplomacy as i think we should continue to pursue diplomatic channels and pursue as well the kind of crippling sanctions. we need to use every resource we have to dissuade them from their nuclear path. but that doesn't mean that we would take off the table our milita
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